Exercising In Triple Digit Temperatures

Even though high school sports practices haven't started quite yet there are still plenty of kids and adults exercising outdoors.

Doctors said there is something to be said for being "use to" these hot temperatures, but that doesn't mean you are immune to the heat.

In some cases it just means people are smarter about planning their activities around these temperatures.

"If you're not use to doing anything outside you shouldn't be outside," said Kadlec ER physician Dr. Fermin Godinez.

He has seen what he believes are a normal amount of heat related incidents comes through the ER doors due to these hot temperatures.  

"I think it's because most of the people who are out and about right now are people from the local community who are use to the heat and know how to plan for it drinking lots of water and staying in the shade," said Godinez.

It seems like people have been adjusting their schedules around the heat.

Natural Selection Crossfit coach Mary Barillas said people who normally come to her afternoon classes have been showing up in the evening instead.

"We definitely had people say it's too hot, that they can't work out as hard as they want to and they can't breathe the heat is so dry," said Barillas.

Organizers of a softball tournament at the TRAC purposely did not schedule games from 3-6 p.m. when it seems to be the hottest.

Tournament rep Rick Hansen said they don't have any set rules on canceling a game if the temperatures get too high. 

Dr. Godinez said if you are going to be physically active in these triple digit temperatures, keep it to short intervals and make sure to drink plenty of water.

He said there are certain signs parents or coaches can look for in people who may be getting over heated or dehydrated.

"Not sweating anymore, saying that they are lightheaded or dizzy, feeling like you might throw-up or nauseated or if you seem them sitting down and not acting like their normal self."