Officials Ask That Wildfire Donations Stop

 

   PATEROS, Wash. (AP) -- Officials in north-central Washington are thankful for the donations that poured into the area after the largest wildfire in the state's history destroyed hundreds of homes and burned hundreds of square miles.
   But now they're pleading the public to stop the donations.
   Community Foundation of North Central Washington director of donor services Jennifer Dolge says the massive amounts of donated items might amount to "a second disaster."
   Dolge told the Wenatchee World that (http://bit.ly/1qLjYig ) figuring out where to store the donations and how to distribute them is going to take a lot of effort.
   Donations for the Carlton Complex fire now fill up three warehouses, two gymnasiums, community distribution centers and several semi-trucks that have not been unloaded.

   PATEROS, Wash. (AP) -- Officials in north-central Washington are thankful for the donations that poured into the area after the largest wildfire in the state's history destroyed hundreds of homes and burned hundreds of square miles.   But now they're pleading the public to stop the donations.   Community Foundation of North Central Washington director of donor services Jennifer Dolge says the massive amounts of donated items might amount to "a second disaster."   Dolge told the Wenatchee World that (http://bit.ly/1qLjYig ) figuring out where to store the donations and how to distribute them is going to take a lot of effort.   Donations for the Carlton Complex fire now fill up three warehouses, two gymnasiums, community distribution centers and several semi-trucks that have not been unloaded.